How can we join others in recognition, lament, and a commitment to reconciliation? 


As we approach the 30th of September,  schools, workplaces, and community centres are taking the opportunity to wear orange as a way to reflect that #everychildmatters. 

This movement began in 2013, based on the experience of then-six-year-old Phyllis Webstad who entered the St. Joseph’s Mission Residential School, outside of Williams Lake, B.C. Phyllis was wearing a brand new orange shirt for her first day of school which the Mission quickly removed and replaced with a school uniform. While she only attended for one year, Phyllis has spoken of the school’s lasting impact. She has said, “ I finally get it, that feeling of worthlessness and insignificance ingrained in me from my first day at the mission… Even now, when I know the truth, I still sometimes feel that I don’t matter.”Phyllis story, and many others, has propelled a national movement to recognize the experience of survivors of Residential Schools, honour them, and show a collective commitment to healing and reconciliation. 

World Partners is happy to participate with each of you in marking this day, and taking the time to learn, listen, and prayerfully consider how each of us can continue to build friendship and stand in solidarity with Indigenous communities. 

 

The Narrative

For Orange Shirt Day (National Day of Truth and Reconciliation), World Partners is happy to participate with each of you in marking this day, and taking the time to learn, listen, and prayerfully consider how each of us can continue to build friendship with Indigenous communities. We are grateful for the leadership of those in and connected to the EMCC who share out of their own experience-either as an Indigenous person or as someone who has actively pursued reconciliation. Let's learn together from these friends who are in a learning posture themselves and taking meaningful action.   


Part 1: Holding Space for Others Stories-sharing the reflections for the week ahead, and hearing from the Nawash House of Prayer team. This group has been introduced to the EMCC family by World Partners supervised workers Stan and Sally Bragg.

Part 2: Choosing an Alongside Posture-reflections from Rob and Sharlene Dilts as they share some of their recent experiences facilitating Pinaaz-Zibi Maamawi and relationally walking alongside the Algonquins of Pikwakanagan First Nation. 

Part 3: A Necessary Response-reflections from Andrew Mills on his own learning and connecting with Indigenous leaders and the corporate journey Bethany Community Church has begun in committing to reconciliation, out of a posture of repentance. 

Part 4: Pursuing Reconcili-ACTION-reflections from Dave Young (Saami-Anishinaabe), a credentialed minister who lives in Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory with his wife Steph. He calls us to rethink how we define reconciliation and the posture we can take as followers of Jesus.  

 

Learn More

Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada

94 Calls to Action

EFC Indigenous Relations

EMCC Response to 215 Children

EMCC Statement Against Racism

An interview with Alison Lefebvre (EMCC representative on the EFC Indigenous-Settler Relations Working Group) and Colin Creighton (Lead Pastor, Zion EMC in Didsbury). 

Land Acknowledgment Template